">
:: Unregistered? Register for a user account.



Christian Topics



Christian Friends

There are 1 unlogged user and 0 registered users online.

You can log-in or register for a user account here.

Languages

Preferred language:


Member's Lounge

1 Corinthians 7:2 Nevertheless, [to avoid] fornication, let every man have his own wife, and let every woman have her own husband.

1 Corinthians 7:2 is often brought up as a proof against polygamy but a closer look shows it's exactly the opposite. The word translated as "her own" that precedes husband is "idios" from which the English word idiosyncrasy derives, one peculiar to her. Now we've all heard the expression "they share the same idiosyncrasy" and indeed, a woman may also share the same husband, as is the case with polygamy, made clear by Paul's choice of the word "idios". On the other hand, the word translated as "his own" that precedes wife is "heautou" which actually translates as "hisself" without conveying a limit in number but a limit in who possesses that wife. For example, in America, if you're from the South or the Inner City and your brother went to get more food at the family reunion you might say, "he got hisself another helping" and by saying that you're not saying he won't get "hisself" a helping again and again, lot's of helpings. Those of us who have not been blessed with this deeper English would say "he got himself another helping" and the meaning of the original Greek would not be as easily conveyed.

KJV Translates 1 Corinthians 7:2 as follows: Nevertheless, [to avoid] fornication, let every man have his own wife, and let every woman have her own husband.

KJV Should be corrected as follows: Nevertheless, [to avoid] fornication, let every man have himself a wife, and let every woman have a husband peculiar to her.

Such a translation is more accurate and does not allow for the twisting of this verse to claim it forbids polygamy for this verse actually shows the authority of man over woman in that he is nowhere limited to one wife but she must have a husband who is idiosyncratic to her... an idiosyncrasy she may indeed share with his other wives.

A commentary, critical and explanatory, on the Old and New Testaments contains the following citation by Steiger which explains the distinction between the words used for "her own" husband and "his own" wife as found in 1 Corinthians 7:2 and elsewhere.
"Nevertheless, [to avoid] fornication, let every man have his own wife, and let every woman have her own husband." 1 Corinthians 7:2

your own—enforcing the obligation: it is not strangers ye are required to be subject to. Every time that obedience is enjoined upon women to their husbands, the Greek,idios,” “one’s own peculiarly,” is used, while the wives of men are designated only by heauton, “of themselves.” Feeling the need of leaning on one stronger than herself, the wife (especially if joined to an unbeliever) might be tempted, though only spiritually, to enter into that relation with another in which she ought to stand to “her own spouse (1Co 14:34, 35, “Let them ask their own [idious] husbands at home”); an attachment to the person of the teacher might thus spring up, which, without being in the common sense spiritual adultery, would still weaken in its spiritual basis the married relation [Steiger]

Jamieson, R., Fausset, A. R., Fausset, A. R., Brown, D., & Brown, D. 1997.
A commentary, critical and explanatory, on the Old and New Testaments.
Theological dictionary of the New Testament contains the following citation by F. Buschel that clarifies the meaning of idios.

God is the pater ídios of Jesus; no others stand in the same relationship (John. 5:18). F. Büschel, IV, 737-41]

Kittel, G., Friedrich, G., & Bromiley, G. W. 1995, c1985.
Theological dictionary of the New Testament.
Translation of: Theologisches Worterbuch zum Neuen Testament. W.B. Eerdmans: Grand Rapids, Michigan

From these two citations we see that idios specifies belonging to one and only one while heautou does not. The New Testament never strays from this language. As Steiger points out, "Every time that obedience is enjoined upon women to their husbands, the Greek,idios,” “one’s own peculiarly,” is used, while the wives of men are designated only by heauton, “of themselves.”" In other words, the law against a woman having another man is built into the very morphemes (elements of meaning) that form the words of the Bible, but there is no such law built into the language of the Bible, nor written in the commands, against a man having more than one wife.*


Note: Are you keeping your wife from sin? There is no reason that your wife should consult any man for advice. The Bible forbids it (1Corinthians 14:34,35) and Steiger has explained how not only is it forbidden in plain language but it's built into the very meaning of the Greek words used to forbid it.

If you have questions or comments concerning this article please
click here
to send a message to Pastor Don.
Polygamy is the common term today for what is more specifically called polygyny.

Site Search


Admonitions

A husband who is limited in the number of wives that he may have is no longer a husband but has in fact become a wife.

-- Pastor Don Milton --

Other Stories

Chat with Pastor Don